Taking the Time to Dry Fire

If you aren’t putting on your belt and holster (if you have one) and dry firing, you aren’t building the neuropathways you will need when you need them the most — in situations under stress or duress. It also trains your eye where to look (hint: focus on the front sight), helps train you to get your sight picture quickly and helps encourage your body to pull the firearm up to your line of sight. Your grip and your stance will be put under stress and you will know very quickly when you draw and drive the firearm forward if you loosen anywhere. This helps you know where to tighten up.

Dry-Fire Practice: Essential Training

Dry-fire practice is an essential part of your training. Training and practice with your firearm should be priority number one as a firearms owner. We practice being safe, accurate, and knowledgeable with these tools we use as a means of self-defense and to enjoy recreationally. When done correctly, dry-fire practice reinforces safe gun handling habits as well as a convenient and inexpensive way to build your skills using repetition without having to be at the range.

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